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EdView360 Summer Break 2016

Posted by EdView360 Blog

Wed, May 25, 2016 @ 01:00 PM

The blog may be on vacation, but we are hard at work!

EdView360 is on summer break. As you refresh, recharge and relax this summer, we will be thinking of new topics to bring you in the fall. If you have any topics that you would like to see in the fall blog, we would love to hear from you!

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Topics: General Education

Are We Punished When Rewarding and Rewarded When We Punish?

Posted by Jeffrey Sprague, Ph.D.

Wed, May 18, 2016 @ 01:30 PM

In his book “Thinking Fast and Slow” (Kahneman, 2011), Daniel Kahneman tells us many critical things about how our minds work, and how those processes affect the manner in which we make decisions. He was awarded the 2002 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences for his life’s work, and presents to us simple rules that can guide how we make decisions about our own lives, including what we purchase and how we get along with our partners, friends, and family. He also illustrates the importance of observing longer term patterns to make decisions, and not allowing single events to lead us to believe that something is “true.”

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Topics: Positive School Climate

Making Mistakes: It’s a Good Thing

Posted by Michael Milone, Ph.D.

Wed, May 11, 2016 @ 01:10 PM

The essence of learning is change. For learning to take place, there must be a change in behavior, cognition, or emotion. In all cases, learning is change. It's not just a good idea, it's the law. If there is no change, there is no learning.

No, this is not an example of the “appeal to extremes” logical fallacy, also known as reductio ad absurdum. Nor is it evidence that I was raised in a Skinner Box. (The row house in South Philadelphia where I spent my first five years was home to three generations, including a grandmother who was born in Ireland.) Learning equals change.

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Topics: General Education, Educational Technology

MAGIC ACTIVATED: Part 2 of 2

Posted by Antavia Hamilton-Ochs

Wed, May 4, 2016 @ 01:15 PM

I am more than a teacher. I am an activator. I'm tasked with lighting thousands upon thousands of little ‘aha’ moments in little minds each year. Not each spark takes hold, but others explode! Sometimes, I get to see the magic take hold in the most powerful of ways. Part 2 of 2.

Carmen came to me a reading-shy freshman. She was ever so polite, with a smile that melts my heart daily.

She'd forget her glasses. She'd quietly chat with her friend. She'd wait for someone to notice she was lost.

In the past, I would give her a heads up before calling on her and be met with panicked eyes. While another student read aloud, I'd go over to her and softly let her know I'd help her. When she started to shut down, I'd smile and let her know that ladies let people know what they need and move forward. I'd remind her that she was still moving ahead.

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Topics: Literacy, Positive School Climate, Parental Involvement, Intervention, Struggling Students

MAGIC ACTIVATED: Part 1 of 2

Posted by Antavia Hamilton-Ochs

Wed, Apr 27, 2016 @ 01:00 PM

I am more than a teacher. I am an activator. I'm tasked with lighting thousands upon thousands of little ‘aha’ moments in little minds each year. Not each spark takes hold, but others explode! Sometimes, I get to see the magic take hold in the most powerful of ways. Part 1 of 2.

Periodically, I stop class for a five-minute life lesson. I teach transferable skills, as many of them as I can, on and off curriculum. As these teachable moments crop up, I seize them. I'm preparing my kiddos for life. I'd be shirking my responsibilities if I didn't teach them the soft skills that subtly support us as we move through the world. My pupils needed to be well read, analytical, adept at critical thinking, and savvy. Most of all, they needed to find their voice. They live in a world that doesn't always tell them their “value.” They are told constantly what they are “worth.”

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Topics: Literacy, Positive School Climate, Parental Involvement, Intervention, Struggling Students

What did you learn today?

Posted by Bea Moore Luchin

Wed, Apr 20, 2016 @ 01:00 PM

As we implement higher standards across the country, it has become increasingly important that we identify and use a variety of strategies to assess student learning so that the appropriate interventions may be provided. 

One strategy is to encourage students to reflect on their reasoning and justify their work.  The idea of justifying your work in mathematics has to go beyond the use of inverse operations to “prove” that the calculation was correct. This way of checking is not justification since it does not address the student’s use of metacognition—the thinking about thinking—that goes beyond the use of an algorithm and takes you into their decision-making processes.

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Topics: Math, Common Core, State Standards, Common Core Math, NCTM Standards

Punish or Empower? A Case for a Shift in Academic Systems

Posted by Michelle George

Tue, Apr 12, 2016 @ 01:00 PM

 

Recent conversations in my faculty lounge have drifted to the sentencing of educators in Georgia who were convicted of tampering with test materials. How did people who presumably care deeply about children end up breaking laws and serving prison time?

We as educators are trained to look beyond the results of a failure and analyze the cause. So what happened in Georgia, and is threatening to happen all over the country? Perhaps the problem is that an assessment is being used for purposes beyond its scope. I contend that if we as educators want to improve our discipline’s professionals, we need to use tools that are proven to do just that.

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Topics: General Education, State Standards, Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports, Assessment

You're Not Average

Posted by Michael Milone, Ph.D.

Wed, Apr 6, 2016 @ 12:45 PM

And neither are your students

Pause for a moment before you continue reading. Think about your friends, your family, your students. Think about yourself. Is anyone average? Of course not. All of us are typical in some ways and not-so-typical in others.

Moreover, this typicality is situational. My wife has spent much of her adult life being the shortest (but cutest) person in the room. My family is relatively tall, and so are our friends. When we visited Hong Kong, she was ecstatic because she was taller than most of the women we encountered. When she went shopping, they had lots of things in her size. (I should add that, despite her shopping disability, my wife has accomplished much in her life, and our house is packed with awards she has won as the CEO of a specialty hospital.)

With these two thoughts in mind—no one is average, and comparisons are situational—consider this question: Why is “average” in the statistical sense such a dominant theme in education? Why do so many people, especially policy makers and politicians, insist on ranking students, schools, teachers, and pretty much everything else on a single number, usually the average? The answer, of course, is because it is easy, and because in the past, looking at averages was a reasonable way to approach some challenges.

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Topics: General Education, Educational Technology

How to Unlock the Language of Math for Your Students

Posted by Bea Moore Luchin

Wed, Mar 30, 2016 @ 12:30 PM

I’d like to take you on another journey along the road of the language of mathematics with a stop at the intersection of “math concepts and symbolic notations.”

Sometimes the mathematics conversation is just as confusing to students as this collection of signs is to a driver in an unfamiliar situation. There appears to be a variety of symbols used to identify the different types of roads in the area, just as we have a variety of concepts, operations, and relations that are conveyed through symbolic notations. 

To further complicate the issue, in math we sometimes have a variety of symbols used to convey the same concept or idea. Imagine the student’s dismay when he or she is not familiar with a new symbolic notation that is being used but is familiar (and perhaps proficient) with a different notation. This can certainly be a blow to some students’ math confidence.

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Topics: Math, Common Core, State Standards, Common Core Math, NCTM Standards

Put Thoughtful Research into Practice for Struggling Math Learners

Posted by John Woodward, Ph.D.

Wed, Mar 23, 2016 @ 01:15 PM

In my previous blog, I argued for a dual topic approach to curriculum design. The framework outlined in that blog is based on a variety of research.

Some of this research is drawn from psychology and studies of human learning. These involve the development of automaticity and controlling cognitive load. Other design elements are associated with what we have learned over the years from international research, particularly the way successful countries focus on fewer topics with greater depth in their math curricula. Still other research is a synthesis of what we believe are best instructional practices in remedial and special education.

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Topics: Math, Common Core, State Standards, Common Core Math, NCTM Standards, Struggling Students

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